Chinese Flavor Profile

Chinese Flavor Profile


FLAVOR PROFILE TABLE
Base:
garlic, ginger and green onions
Spices:
crushed red pepper flakes, dried chile peppers, five spice powder, star anise, sesame seeds, Szechuan pepper
Herbs:
basil, cilantro
Trademarks:
bean paste, bean sprouts, bok choy (Chinese cabbage), cellophane noodles, Chinese chile paste, dried mushrooms, hoisin sauce, hot chile oil, hot mustard, orange zest, oyster mushrooms, oyster sauce, rice, rice noodles, sherry, snow peas, soy sauce, toasted sesame oil, tofu, water chestnuts

THREE, TWO, ONE

A Chinese-inspired dish begins with this simple 3|2|1 cooking method:

3 base ingredients + 2 (or more) spices + 1 (or more) herb + trademarks (optional)


FIVE SIGNATURE chinese DISHES
chow mein
dumplings
hot and sour soup
sweet and sour pork
won tons

NOBLE SUGGESTIONS
  • A batch of sweet and sour can be made with pantry staples in a couple minutes. In fact, it would probably take less time to make this versatile condiment than make a special trip to the store to buy it. I’ll let you search for your favorite recipe.  There are several out there. Ready…go!
  • spice mixology {marinade} + spice infusion + building flavor basics = stir fry technique
  • What is the difference between chow mein and lo mein? Noodle texture. Chow mein dishes have crispier noodles. Fry parboiled noodles first at a higher heat to a crunchier texture, then pour sauce, meat and vegetables over. Lo mein has a softer noodle. This is accomplished by adding the parboiled noodles toward the end of the stir fry process.

BRAG AND BLOOPERS

Lets be honest. Sometimes brilliance happens in the kitchen and other times it is a complete fiasco. We want to hear it all. Brag about new cooking skills or let us share in the frustration. Please reply to this post.

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